When to Visit Barcelona: Calendar of Festivals and Events

Barcelona is the kind of city that you can visit all year around, but there are several unique festivals and events that you might want to consider when planning your trip that will make your time here truly memorable. Here is an overview of some of our favorites.

January – April: Calçots Season
January – April: Calçots SeasonOnce the Christmas season is behind us, attention turns to the celebration of a seasonal, Catalan vegetable: the mighty calçot. Not quite a scallion, not quite a leek, this local delight causes quite a stir around these parts, with thousands flocking to farmhouses dotted around the Catalan countryside to attend organised calçot parties, or calçotadas. Guests are invited to don plastic gloves and bibs, before mountains of barbecued calçot are delivered to the table, served up with delicious romesco sauce. It is quite a messy affair, but extremely good fun. If you are in Catalunya during this season you should definitely make time to experience this slice of Catalan culture.

For more information about calçots click here for a dedicated post taken from our blog archive. And to see calçot eating in action watch the video below.

 

April 23rd: The Fiesta of San Jordi: Catalunya’s Day of Love
April 23rd: The Fiesta of San Jordi: Catalunya’s Day of LoveMove over Saint Valentine, here in Catalunya the most romantic day of the year is on April 23rd in celebration of Saint George (San Jordi), the patron saint of Catalonia. Traditionally this day is celebrated with the exchanging of gifts: red roses for the ladies, and books for the men! This date has now become synonymous with a celebration of Catalan literature, with many local authors waiting until April 23rd to release their latest works. It is not uncommon for these authors to even sign copies of their books at the many temporary book stalls that are erected in downtown Barcelona, especially along Rambla Catalunya.

For more information about this festival and associated traditions click here for a post taken from our blog archive.

 

June 23rd/24th: San Joan: The Summer Solstice 
June 23rd/24th: San Joan: The Summer SolsticeAlthough this festival officially marks the birth of Saint John The Baptist on June 24th, in reality the celebrations take place during the evening of June 23rd, and generally people consider it to mark the summer solstice. During the evening the whole city of Barcelona comes alive, with fireworks, street parties, bonfires and most importantly beach parties, which go on into the early hours.

For more information about this festival and associated traditions click here for a post taken from our blog archive.

 

August 15th – 21st: Festa Major de Gràcia August 15th - 21st: Festa Major de Gràcia Each neighborhood of Barcelona has their own annual festival, but without doubt the most impressive has to be the one held in the bohemian barrio of Gràcia. As with most festivals you can expect to experience such spectacles as human towers (castells), processions of giants (gegants), fire-breathing dragons (correfocs), but the focal point of proceedings are the imaginative and highly decorative street designs, with various streets competing to be named the winner for that year. Once release the program will be available at the following website: www.festamajordegracia.cat

For more information about the Festa Major de Gràcia click here for a post taken from our blog archive.

 

September 24th: Festes de la Mercè

September 24th: Festes de la Mercè
Although the Feste Major de Gracia is arguably the best neighborhood festival, the big guns really do get rolled out for the city-wide Festes De La Mercè! This festival was first established in 1871 to honor the city’s patron saint, La Mare de Déu de la Mercè (Our Lady of Mercy), and itself takes place on September 24th, but there are several days of partying and events in the run up to this date. This is a perfect time of the year to visit, the weather is still warm without being humid, so you can thoroughly enjoy the full program of outdoor events, which includes free concerts, lights shows and installations, fireworks  and all of the traditional events associated with Catalan festivals (parades of giants, human towers, dancing devils, etc.) Each year Barcelona invites a different guest city to collaborate with proceedings, in 2014 it was Stockholm, and this year it is Buenos Aires. Once release the program will be available at the following website: www.merce.bcn.cat

For more information about this festival and associated traditions click here for a post taken from our blog archive. And watch the video below for a glimpse of what happened at last year’s La Mercè.

 

Visit our website at www.HiThisIsBarcelona.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s